1. Caro Visitante, por que não gastar alguns segundos e criar uma Conta no Fórum Valinor? Desta forma, além de não ver este aviso novamente, poderá participar de nossa comunidade, inserir suas opiniões e sugestões, fazendo parte deste que é um maiores Fóruns de Discussão do Brasil! Aproveite e cadastre-se já!

Dismiss Notice
Visitante, junte-se ao Grupo de Discussão da Valinor no Telegram! Basta clicar AQUI. No WhatsApp é AQUI. Estes grupos tem como objetivo principal discutir, conversar e tirar dúvidas sobre as obras de J. R. R. Tolkien (sejam os livros ou obras derivadas como os filmes)

10 livros que influenciaram Tolkien

Tópico em 'Influências, Seguidores e Recomendações' iniciado por Haleth, 26 Out 2011.

  1. Haleth

    Haleth There's no such a thing as a mere mortal

    Desculpa, tá em inglês e to com uma preguiça colossal de traduzir isso. XD
    Quem quiser ler as justificativas pra esse Top 10 específico, espia
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    .

    1. Beowulf by Anonymous

    Beowulf is a classic tale of good vs. evil that pits the hero, Beowulf, against two monsters and a dragon. Tolkien was Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University from 1925 to 1945 and read and wrote extensively about Beowulf and other Old- and Middle English epic poetry. Tolkien delivered a seminal lecture on Beowulf called “Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics” in 1936 and a hard-to-find book on the subject, “Beowulf and the Critics”—which collects much of Tolkien’s Beowulf scholarship in one place—came out in 2002. Tolkien even translated Beowulf himself (his hand-written translation was discovered in 2003).

    2. The Worm Ouroboros by Eric Rücker Eddison

    This very densely written and highly imaginative fantasy novel about a heroic King versus the Lords of Demonland was published in 1922. While Tolkien didn’t buy the philosophical beliefs put forth in the novel and denied that Eddison was an influence on his own writing, he nonetheless once wrote in a letter that “I still think of [Eddison] as the greatest and most convincing writer of ‘invented worlds’ that I have read.” The term “middle Earth” is used in the book, too, to describe the place where the characters live. Eddison was also a sometime guest reader at meetings of The Inklings, an informal literary discussion group at Oxford University that counted Tolkien and Chronicles of Narnia author, C. S. Lewis among its members.

    3. The Prose Edda by (probably) Snorri Sturluson and the Poetic Edda by Anonymous


    Both of these are quintessential classics of Ancient Norse literature, poetry and mythology. Tolkien wrote about, lectured on and translated these works himself over the course of many years at Oxford University. In addition, many character names like “Gimli” derive directly from Norse mythology. “Gandalf” can be translated as “magic elf” in Old Norse and many believe that Gandalf is inspired by Odin, one of the main Gods in Norse mythology.

    4. The Marvelous Land of the Snergs, by A. E. Wyke-Smith

    Tolkien called this 1927 collection of tales about a Hobbit-like character (a Snerg) named Gorbo (who is “only slightly taller than the average table”) a “Sourcebook” for The Hobbit and read the book to his children. Read more about the similarity between Snergs and Hobbits here.

    5. The House of the Wolfings and The Roots of the Mountains by William Morris

    Tolkien read these early fantasy novel reconstructions of early Germanic life as a child and was profoundly influenced by them. In particular, the name “Gandolf” can be found in these books and scholars suggest that Gollum and The Dead Marshes from The Lord of the Rings draw inspiration from Morris’s works. Fangorn forest and the character of Wormtongue are also said to be inspired by characters from Morris.

    J.R.R. Tolkien references

    Books Chris consulted from his personal library

    6. The Book of Wonder by Lord Dunsany


    Lord Dunsany was a prolific fantasy short story writer (primarily) who wrote around the turn of the 20th Century. Tolkien mentions Dunsany’s works many times in his collected letters. In one letter he talks about Dunsany’s fantasy character-naming abilities and later in life Tolkien writes fondly about Dunsany’s “Chu-Bu and Sheemish” story. Tolkien also once presented a scholar, Clyde S. Kilby with a copy of The Book of Wonder to help prepare him for his role working on Tolkien’s The Silmarillion (The Lord of the Rings “back story” or “Legendarium” Tolkien wrote over the course of his whole life).

    7. She by H. Rider Haggard

    Haggard is perhaps best known for his book King Solomon’s Mines which was later made into a several Hollywood movies. But She is acknowledged as one of Haggard’s most influential works—on many writers and books that followed She’s 1887 publication. Tolkien once said in an interview “I suppose as a boy She interested me as much as anything” and also said that another Haggard novel, Eric Brighteyes, was “as good as most sagas and as heroic.” Some scholars have noted similarities between the royal elf Galadriel in The Lord of the Rings and the main character in She.

    8. The Red Fairy Book and The Lilac Fairy Book, Edited by Andrew Lang


    Scottish dude Andrew Lang edited an immensely popular series of twelve fairy tale collections at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Centuries. Each book is named with a color and contains fairy tales from around the world including translations of many international tales that, before Lang, had never before been read in English.

    “The Story of Sigurd”, the last tale in The Red Fairy Book, contains many parallels to Tolkien’s The Hobbit including magic rings, a magic sword and a grouchy, terrible, ferocious dragon. “The Story of Sigurd” is itself a retelling of the Sigurd story from the Völsunga saga, an ancient Icelandic saga that Tolkien was also quite fond of and studied at Oxford University.

    I think I’m the only one to point out that the odd word, “Moria” also appears in the title of another The Red Fairy Book tale called “Soria Moria Castle” and I wonder if Tolkien lifted the word from here for The Mines of Moria locale in The Lord of the Rings (or if it is an uncanny coincidence).

    Tolkien refers to the introduction to The Lilac Fairy Book in his seminal lecture/essay on fairy tales called, you guessed it, “On Fairy Stories” which legitimizes Fantasy as a serious adult literary genre/form, some say for the first time in history.

    9. A Voyage to Arcturus, by David Lindsay

    Tolkien says in a letter in the 1930s that he read the book “with avidity” “as a thriller” and praised it as a work of philosophy, religion, and morality. Fellow Inkling member C. S. Lewis liked it so much that he later wrote his entire Out of the Silent Planet trilogy based on A Voyage to Arcturus’s central premise (which is: traveling spiritually to another planet).

    10. The Princess and the Goblin, by George McDonald

    McDonald, a prolific Scottish writer of adult literature (and a minister), also wrote several fantasies, including this book which influenced The Hobbit, most strikingly its goblin characters. McDonald’s The Princess and the Curdie also was an influence on Tolkien, as were McDonald’s fairy tales, especially “The Golden Key.” In a 1938 letter to the Observer newspaper, Tolkien stated that some ideas in The Hobbit “derived from (previously digested) epic, mythology, and fairy-story—not, however, Victorian in authorship, as a rule to which George MacDonald is the chief exception”. Tolkien also read The Princess and the Goblin to his kids.
     
    • Ótimo Ótimo x 1
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  2. Tilion

    Tilion Administrador

    Achei que seria mais uma daquelas listas de "pseudoinfluências" no Tolkien, mas essa na verdade é bem precisa.

    Da lista, já traduzi o The Book of Wonder (publicado pela Arte e Letra como
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    , que também inclui outro livro do Dunsany, The Last Book of Wonder), estou traduzindo o The Marvellous Land of Snergs (que também será publicado pela Arte e Letra) e há outros dali que já foram/estão sendo considerados para tradução.

    EDIT: E a essa altura o
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    já foi traduzido e publicado. =]
     
    Última edição: 6 Mar 2013
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  3. Haleth

    Haleth There's no such a thing as a mere mortal

    Uau, que super bacana! Não sabia q vc era tradutor...
     
  4. Calib

    Calib Visitante

    O Tilion é o mais novo membro do meu Hall of Heroes do fórum. :rofl:
     
  5. imported_Rafaela

    imported_Rafaela Usuário

    Que bom Tilion! Quero ler esses livros, só li da lista Beowulf e a Princesa e o Goblin, livro pelo qual me apaixonei e criei um tópico aqui no Meia!
     
  6. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

    Desculpem por desenterrar um tópico tão velho, em primeiro lugar! Eu queria saber se alguém conhece uma edição em português da Edda poética ou em prosa? Eu pesquisei no fórum, mas não encontrei nada a respeito. Já li alguns trechos em inglês, mas queria saber se existe uma edição em português. Eu até cheguei a mandar um email pra Carmen Seganfredo (autora dos livros da série "As Melhores Histórias da Mitologia..."), mas não tive resposta. Agradeço qualquer dica!
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  7. Ilmarinen

    Ilmarinen Usuário

    Tem o Edda em Prosa sim, esse inclusive, eu comprei já nos anos noventa.

    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)


    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)


    A Canção do Nibelungo e a Volsunga Saga também estão disponíveis em português e há uma excelente adaptação do Anel do Nibelungo do Wagner em Quadrinhos.

    E acho que vc vai gostar um bocadão disso aí:
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
     
    Última edição: 4 Mar 2013
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 4
    • Ótimo Ótimo x 1
  8. Thor

    Thor ἀλήθεια

    Faltou o Paradise Lost. Mas é um ótimo tópico.
     
  9. Tar-Mairon

    Tar-Mairon DARK LORD AND LOVING DAD

    .

    Nenhum do Robert E. Howard, pai do gênero "Sword And Sorcery"?

    .
     
  10. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

    Muito obrigado pelas sugestões, Ilmarinen!

    O primeiro livro eu tenho a impressão que só encontrarei em sebos, né? Quando pesquisei sobre a Edda em prosa, eu encontrei o livro
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    . Alguém conhece?

    A Canção de Nibelungos eu já conheço e tem uma edição da Hedra da
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    que to pensando em comprar.

    Também gostei da sugestão de leitura sobre mitologia germano-escandinava! Obrigado.

    Infelizmente ainda não achei nenhuma tradução da Edda poética, então continuo com ela em inglês mesmo.
     
  11. Tilion

    Tilion Administrador

    Não existe tradução da Edda Poética em português. E essa Edda em Prosa acima é uma tradução de uma tradução em inglês, se não me engano. Tradução direta do islandês antigo ainda não existe.
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  12. Ilmarinen

    Ilmarinen Usuário

    Realmente, a tradução foi feita de um original em inglês e não do idioma norueguês. Mas quem não tem cão...
     
    Última edição: 7 Mar 2013
  13. JLM

    JLM mata o branquelo detta walker

    odin

    vou aproveitar o tópico p fazer uma pergunta off já q falamos d influência e tenho certeza q os expertos manjam + dq eu.

    ontem vi o episódio piloto da série vikings, do history channel.

    qdo odin aparece ñ pude deixar d lembrar do gandalf. alguém sabe se tem algo a ver?
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  14. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

    Tem tudo a ver - não apenas Gandalf com Odin, mas também a sua pergunta com o tópico. Em primeiro lugar, o nome Gandalf deriva de Gandalfr, que é o nome de um dos anões do poema Völupsá, da Edda poética. Em segundo lugar, Gandalf e Odin assumem a forma de velhos andarilhos quando andam entre os mortais. Em terceiro lugar, Gandalf, assim como Odin, possui muitos nomes.
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 4
    • Ótimo Ótimo x 1
  15. Meneldur

    Meneldur We are infinite.

    Tem a ver sim.Gandalf é frequentemente comparado com Odin por vários comentadores tolkienianos. Os dois são peregrinos, usam chapéu, cajado, tem barba. Dá pra ver bem a semelhança entre os dois
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    .

    O próprio Tolkien, na carta 107, chama Gandalf de "viajante odinico".
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 4
  16. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

  17. Tar-Mairon

    Tar-Mairon DARK LORD AND LOVING DAD

    .

    Ironicamente, Odin também é uma das influências para criação de Sauron.

    .
     
  18. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

    Essa é nova pra mim. O aspecto mitológico que conhecia do Olho de Sauron era Osíris. Talvez o olho de Odin também seja outro paralelo mitológico.
     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1
  19. Tar-Mairon

    Tar-Mairon DARK LORD AND LOVING DAD

    .

    E eu nunca tinha pensado em Osíris como influência na criação de Sauron :lol: . Bom, creio que o anel de Odin, Draupnir (
    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)
    ) é a principal influência deste deus nórdico em Sauron.

    Este conteúdo é limitado a Usuários. Por favor, cadastre-se para poder ver o conteúdo e participar (não demora e não possui custos)


    .
     
  20. Grimnir

    Grimnir Usuário

    Sobre o anel Draupnir, realmente é um possível paralelo, embora isso me lembre a resposta de Tolkien quando questionado se o Um Anel tinha alguma relação com o Anel de Nibelungo:

     
    • Gostei! Gostei! x 1

Compartilhar